Articles, news, reviews and information for the diabetic or caregivers
AddThis Social Bookmark Button


English flagItalian flagGerman flagSpanish flagFrench flagPortuguese flagJapanese flagKorean flagChinese flagArabic flagRussian flag

Diabetic Food - Reading Food Labels Properly Is Key To Your Health

Posted by Dean Shainin on Jun 1st, 2007 in Foods & Eating

Diabetic Food - Reading Food Labels Properly Is Key To Your Health With diabetic food, it all comes down to the nutrition facts. It’s that list of nutrition information found on the package of foods sold in the grocery store. Reading food labels can help you make wise choices about the foods you buy. The labels will tell you what ingredients were used, the amount of calories, and other pertinent information essential to a diabetes patient.

For instance, a typical food label would contain the total amounts per serving for the following nutrients:

  • Calories
  • Total fat
  • Saturated fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Total carbohydrate
  • Fiber

Use the nutrition facts found in food labels to compare similar types of foods and buy the one that contains fewer calories, lower fats, cholesterol, etc.

Pay close attention to free foods like sugar-free gelatin desert, sugar-free ice pops, sugarless gum, diet soft drinks, and sugar-free syrups. Just because they are called “free” does not mean they are entirely free of calories so don’t be overconfident. Instead, read the label. Most free foods should have less than 20 calories and 5 grams of carbohydrates per serving.

Another thing, “no-sugar added” means no sugar was added during the manufacture and packaging of the foods. The ingredients do not include sugar. However, the food may be high in carbohydrates still so be sure to read the label carefully.

Fat-free foods could still mean that they contain lots of carbohydrates. Often, they contain almost the same amount of calories as the foods they replace so be sure to pay attention to the label. Buying fat-free foods instead of regular foods does not necessarily mean that you are making a wise choice.

Now, you know that sweets are generally discouraged among diabetic foods. However, having diabetes does not necessarily mean that you cannot have sweets. Imagine how bad life can be for the sweet tooth with diabetes. But as long as you keep your intake of sweets in moderation, there is no reason you have to eschew sugar from your life forever. After all, glucose (sugar) is still the most basic source of energy that the body needs.

So sweeten your foods with these following diabetic food options:

  • Sugar and other sweeteners with calories: honey, brown sugar, molasses, fructose, cane sugar, and confectioners sugar
  • Reduced calorie sweeteners: erythritol, hydrogenated starch hydrolysates, isomalt, lactitol, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylitol
  • Low calories sweeteners: ascelfume potassium, aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose

Research has overturned the long standing belief that sugar caused diabetes. The new studies show us that sugar has in fact the same effect on blood glucose levels as other carbohydrates like bread and potatoes. Based on this discovery, experts agree that a diabetic can now consume sugar as long as they incorporate it into their meal plan the way they would with any ordinary carbohydrate-containing foods.

Now that you have been pointed to the right direction with these tips to improve your diabetic food diet, you can go ahead and live a healthier, fuller life where nothing – no carb nor sweets – is denied you, as long as you keep it all in moderation.

Always consult your doctor when considering which types of diabetic foods are best for your health situation.


Related Posts:
  1. Diabetic Food - Reading Food Labels Properly Is Key To Your Health
  2. The Myth About Sugar Free Foods
  3. Diabetic Food Pyramid - An Effective Solution To Health Problems
  4. A Dietary Overhaul for Diabetics
  5. A Diabetic Diet is Key to Managing Diabetes
  6. Choose the Right Foods to Lower Your Blood Sugar Level
  7. Protein: Common or Missing Link?
  8. The Glycemic Index: Key To Weight Loss Or Just Another Diet Gimmick?
  9. Nutrition Standards for Juvenile Diabetics
  10. South Beach Diet Or Another Fad Diet?

You must be logged in to post a comment.